A Duplicated Gene Shaped Human Brain Evolution

A Duplicated Gene Shaped Human Brain Evolution

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Two groups of researchers, led by Evan Eichler and Franck Polleux, have found that humans, alone among all animals, have three extra copies of a gene called SRGAP2, which is involved in brain development. The second of these copies, SRGAP2C, is particularly interesting because it affects the development of neurons, and produces features that are distinctively human. It also emerged between 2 and 3 million years ago, during the time when our brains became much bigger.

Genes are often duplicated by mistake when DNA is copied or shuffled around. These duplications provide raw fuel for fast evolution. Suddenly, genes get back-up copies. Either the original or the duplicate can mutate with impunity and take on new roles. But duplications also cause big problems for scientists who are trying to sequence genomes.

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