Mass Extinction Study Provides Lessons for Modern World

Mass Extinction Study Provides Lessons for Modern World

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

The Cretaceous Period of Earth history ended with a mass extinction that wiped out numerous species, most famously the dinosaurs. A new study now finds that the structure of North American ecosystems made the extinction worse than it might have been. Researchers published their findings online in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

The mountain-sized asteroid that left the now-buried Chicxulub impact crater on the coast of Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula is almost certainly the ultimate cause of the end-Cretaceous mass extinction, which occurred 65 million years ago. Nevertheless, “Our study suggests that the severity of the mass extinction in North America was greater because of the ecological structure of communities at the time,” noted lead author Jonathan Mitchell, a Ph.D. student of UChicago’s Committee on Evolutionary Biology.

Social media & sharing icons powered by UltimatelySocial